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20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
time, we're getting a look at what the white house is offering to stop the fiscal cliff stalemate. drastic mandatory tax hikes and spending cuts will kick in with the new year unless the white house and the republicans can reach a deal. for weeks, gop lawmakers have said we're just waiting for the white house to give details, specifics, some numbers. well, tonight that's happened. the white house is calling their bluff and they've laid out how they want to cut the debt. jessica yellin is over at the white house for us tonight with new developments. jessica, what are the specifics of this offer tonight? >> reporter: hi, wolf. according to senior officials on both sides of the aisle, the president is asking for $1.6 trillion in new taxes. that includes raising taxes for families who make $250,000 or more. you'll recognize that as a pledge from his campaign. and it also includes limiting deductions and loopholes as well as other changes to capital gains and dividends taxes. well, that is the headline for republicans, wolf, who say it is far more money in tax rates than they ever expe
offer a counter proposal on the fiscal cliff. their plan, $2.2 trillion deficit savings over the next decade, but it does not include higher tax rates for the wealthy. the house speaker john boehner calls it a credible plan that deserves serious consideration by the white house. guess what? the white house released a statement tonight saying the plan is nothing new, that it lowers rates for the wealthy and sticks the middle class with the bill. so to borrow a phrase, we're nowhere. period. david walker is president and ceo of comeback america initiative. he's made it his mission to promote fiscal responsibility. he joins us along with cnn political analyst, david gergen. the house republicans put forward their counter proposal. speaker boehner says it's credible and the white house should consider it. is it credible or is it more of what you have called the irresponsible unethical immoral behavior of all the politicians here in washington? >> i think both sides are now putting things on the table but i think they're confused. what we have to do in the short term is avoid the fiscal cl
back from the election, we want to get the fiscal cliff resolved, but yet we aren't seeing anything from the white house. we see some disingenuous moves like the one that was done today. last week it was oh, you guys go first, we're not going to put anything on the table until you vote for a tax increase. so many of us fear that the president's real plan here was to let us go over the cliff and blame the republicans, and that's what we look like we're being set up to do, and then if you go over the cliff, then two months later, a month later, the president can come back with a bill and say hey, we're going to now, since the republicans let everyone's taxes go up, i'm going to ride in here now, be the knight in shining armor and lower the taxes on the lower two brackets and of course, the republicans who one of our main values is lower taxes, would support something like that. >> congressman terry, that doesn't make any sense to me because while that sounds like logic, there's that other side of the fiscal cliff, all those horrible cuts that could plunge us into a depression and all
% want government leaders to compromise on the fiscal cliff. just 25% said they should stick to their principles. so why is it that this congress and this white house can't seem to get together and compromise on a deal? it certainly isn't the first time republicans and democrats haven't seen eye-to-eye on an important issue but the players in this debate seem to be almost allergic to budging even a little bit. republican senator john mccain says it hasn't always been that way and it's time for both sides to sit down together. >> it's time now to sit across the table from one another rather than me saying what i could accept and wouldn't accept, why don't we have the president and our leaders, republican and democrat, sit across the table the way they did with bill clinton, the way they did with ronald reagan, and the way you get things done in washington, rather than saying hey, would you stick with grover norquist or would you not or would you address entitlements or not. i believe it's vital that we address the entitlements, who are the elephant in the room, but that would
officials would behave like spoiled children in the fiscal cliff discussions. only 28% said they would behave like responsible adults. tonight, signs that maybe some adult behavior might be prevail. and a compromise might be reached. joining me now live is senior white house correspondent dana bash, jessica yellin and david gergen. what's the latest? what are you hearing? >> reporter: they are a long way from a deal. but late today speaker boehner and president obama did speak to one another on the phone. now, this is an important development because it's the first time they've talked in a week about the fiscal cliff. i am told, though, that there was no real progress in negotiations. in this sense there was no breakthrough on that central point of tax rates. as you know, president obama insists there is no deal unless the gop agrees to raise rates on the top 2% of earners. the gop says that's a nonstarter. and the two men have not moved from that basic position. now, all of this comes at the same time treasury secretary geithner also said for the first time the administration would be
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)